Pet Diabetes: Early Detection & Successful Management Have Positive Effects

A gray-striped cat with golden eyes lays on a colorful bedspread, looking wary.

All animals are unique in the ways they behave, but there are generally tell-tale signs that something’s amiss. Sure, domestic and wild animals alike may try to hide symptoms of illness or injury, but there’s no mistaking excessive thirst and increased urination in our four-legged friends. With undiagnosed pet diabetes, pets may beg for food and continue to lose weight. Early detection is the key to successful long-term management, and marks the beginning of a chapter in the lives of both pets and their owners.

Risk Factors

Pet diabetes can develop at a higher rate in overweight or obese pets. Higher risk pets may include senior pets, those with Cushing’s disease, hyperthyroidism, or chronic pancreatitis, pets on steroids, and pregnant females. Older female dogs are more likely to be diagnosed than older male dogs; senior male cats are considered higher risk than aging female cats.

That being said, pet diabetes can occur in any pet regardless of age or lifestyle. Genetics may also play a part.

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